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IABC NJ Spring Social Shows How Comedy Can Enable Standout Communications

Comedy can enable standout communications... it comes with risk, but can bring great rewards.

That’s how Chip Ambrogio characterizes the use of humor in strategic communications, both inside and outside an organization. The award-winning communicator, comedian and comedy writer provided insights on leveraging the power of the laugh to educate and inspire during IABC New Jersey’s recent Spring Social. The social brought together nearly 50 New Jersey communications professionals, both IABC members and beyond, May 17 at the Basking Ridge Country Club. ??Chip’s background as a stand-up comedian and comedy writer includes writing for the Friars Club Roast, TV and film, and many of today's top performers. He has successfully used that experience to add appropriate humor and fun to a diverse corporate communications. He showed how appealing to an audience’s funny bone can raise awareness, create a sense of community, enhance performance and align with an organization’s corporate mission.

But, first, about those risks, which are office politics and egos, the chance of stepping on toes, navigating areas of diversity and inclusion, to name a few. Comedy is subjective, and some people are literal. Balance those with the rewards – using humor can stand out from traditional tactics. It can also create connection on multiple levels – whether it’s great writing, great performance or a strong emotional appeal. Great comedians – Robin Williams, Richard Pryor and George Carlin – mastered each of these, respectively, Chip shared.

Chip’s own comedic journey began nearly a quarter century ago when he was in a job he hated. An advertisement for a comedy class in the Village Voice caught his eye, and he entered the world of stand up. At the same time, he began a new job in communications.

“For the last 23 years, I’ve been dealing with difficult audiences, prima donnas and with hecklers, and then of course there was the stand-up,” Chip says. “But the more I did stand-up at night and communications during the day, the more I saw the connection – the cross-over skills – where comedy could help me with my day job.”?Chip’s takeaways included:

  • Write for the stage, not for the page. Be conversational, be engaging and humanize the perspective.
  • Get to the point, and do it fast. Writing a great joke is about getting from the set-up to the punch line as fast as possible. The approach also applies to communications tactics.
  • Make the core message clear. Great communication and great comedy is stripping down to the connection … to what the audience can take home with them.
  • Comedy lets you create characters and tell a story. “By putting the characters in similar situation as the audience, we build empathy and understanding, and get them to laugh,” says Chip. “It’s less parental and more organic way to get the word out.”
  • Take risks, and enjoy success.
  • All you really need is that first one to work. You need someone to believe and then deliver on it.


According to Chip, learning to use humor appropriately in a corporate situation is an art, but if you're willing to take a chance the benefits are many. After all, comedy can elicit an emotional reaction much more than any email can. Seinfeld would say if an audience does not laugh at a joke, it means they do not like the joke. It does not mean they do not like me. Chip adds: “That fearlessness allows you to open doors, get buy-in on projects other people may be afraid to pitch, and open up new ways to connect with your audience.”??Thank you to IABC New Jersey Spring Social cocktail opening hour sponsor Davis & Company, as well as IABC sponsors Spi Group, Monmouth University, Fairleigh Hickinson University, BMW Morristown and HomeAdvisor. Find out more about IABC New Jersey, join and get involved at the IABC New Jersey website.

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Staying Social - Media Relevant in the New Year

By Erica Martell

I just bought myself a new pair of pants one size smaller for two reasons:  One, I hope to lose some weight and two, I’m told that they’ll stretch.  This is a little bit how we all start our New Year isn’t it?  We set goals for ourselves that are somewhat uncomfortable, hoping that we’ll also stretch and adjust to them.

This brings me to my New Year’s topic:  How do we, as communicators, stay relevant with regard to our social media outreach?

I've noticed that when some approach a social media campaign they toss out all that they know about communications. I'm not sure why, but it's a mistake. The rules are the same: Keep the basics in mind.

  1. Know your audience:  Are they female or male?  Are they millennials or boomers?  What career level does your demographic fall into? 

  2. Do your research:  Look at where your groups live and breathe on social media, maybe this means doing a survey to a segmented group of your prospective list to find out.

  3. Pick a platform:  Start with a platform that you’re comfortable in and suits your audience.

  4. Video is the language of social according to Anna Gonzalez, Head of Social Media & Video, at Nasdaq.  Brands are becoming media companies which yields higher engagement and makes them more monetizable. Video also helps sell anything from products to services.

  5. Share or curate content that is relevant to your industry.  Comment or join a conversation in online discussion groups that are timely.

  6. Measure the ROI of social media for your brand.  Key performance indicators such as Google Analytics or open rates are often not given enough credit.  Knowing what worked or failed in your social media campaign will help you adjust your efforts going forward.

“Taking each of these points and making it a whole strategy will be key to your social media success,” claims Becky Livingston, CEO of Penheel Marketing. “Social media is not a set-it-and-forget-it deal. You have to monitor, measure, and adjust your strategy along the way—just as you would with any resolution or goal.”


Social media is a practice of regimen:  you must be consistent. Unless you represent a well- known and beloved brand, to have impact, you cannot dive in once in a while and expect people to follow you any more than you will fit into those new pants by dieting once a month.  Take it at your own pace.  As you get feedback from your followers, you’ll be encouraged to expand your social media initiatives.

Erica A. Martell is a marketer, content and business development writer and social media professional.  She generates leads and grows revenue for clients by working smart, even with the most challenging of budgets. She is also recognized for her traditional integrated marketing campaigns which include direct mail, e-mail and online. Skilled in the strategy and execution of key messaging and social media for B-to-B events, programs and services, she tells clients’ stories in a clear and compelling way to drive engagement and profits. 

As a consultant for EAM Marketing, she represents a range of companies in education, professional development and media services. Erica is a member of New York Women in Communications, (NYWICI), from which she received a Membership Empowerment Grant and holds a BA from Allegheny College.  She is an active participant in IABC and Toastmasters and an avid movie, culture and theater enthusiast.

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8 Things to Include in a Branding RFP By Lou Leonardis, Partner and Branding Creative Director at Trillion

Searching for a company to create or redesign your organization’s brand can be daunting. A good first step for finding the right resource is to generate a request for proposal, or RFP.

A carefully crafted RFP will create interest in your project, while clearly expressing your problems and goals. On the other hand, an RFP that is not well prepared could be disregarded and ignored by reputable creative teams. 

It is important to consider that the process of responding to an RFP is time consuming for branding companies; they will need to determine whether it is worth the effort to respond.

Some considerations include:

  • Whether they feel they have a good chance of winning,
  • If the project requirements clearly reflect their capabilities, portfolio and organizational set-up, and
  • The availability of a contact person to discuss the project with them.

The following tips define a proposal format that will reflect your organization's professionalism, provide the best information for your possible resopndents and make it easier to compare their responses when you receive them.  

1) Provide Your Company Background

Providing a high-level overview of your company and its history is important to help the branding companies understand more about your business. Include information about your “perceived” mission, vision and value proposition statements. I say “perceived” because you may need these defined or redefined by your branding company; they might not exist or may no longer be relevant. Either way, try to be as descriptive as possible in saying who you are, what you do, who you help, and how you help.

2) Define Your Problem or Challenge

Sometimes a brand can have internal or external issues — or both. Clearly define the challenges and issues your company is having. An example could be inconsistent messaging from business unit to business unit, or the fact that your brand is perceived as dated or irrelevant in the current marketplace. Explain the immediate problems as well as potential long-term problems that you foresee. Frequently, the branding and rebranding process reveals unknown issues that will need to be solved by the branding team.

3) Define the Scope of the Project

Clearly list specific deliverables or tasks you require, such as:

  • Conducting research (such as interviews, focus groups, surveys)
  • Auditing existing brand and marketing materials
  • Defining user personas
  • Creating an online brand guideline
  • Designing specific marketing collateral

You will want to identify the volume of content, number of applications, quantity of interviews or any other specifics the branding company should consider. Another option is to ask the branding company to define the scope as they see it as part of the RFP.

If you are unclear about the project scope, or need help defining it, specify your expectations by requesting a discovery phase with minimum requirements noted, such as the number of meetings or research that will be shared. Then list what you expect to learn from the discovery phase.

4) Define Your Ideal Candidate

Stating that you want to work with a team that is based within a specific geographic location or is of a certain size is helpful. You may want to require that all team members be employees of the branding company and not consultants or freelancers. You can also list your preferences for experience.

5) Define Your Selection Criteria

Defining how and when you will select finalists and determine the eventual winner of the bid is critical. Are you most interested in a branding studio’s portfolio? Relevant work samples? Or is price the most important deciding factor? Defining the key factors will help ensure that your expectations are met. To be fair to the branding companies responding, stay committed to your dates and keep them informed of any delays.

Additionally, I recommend requiring relevant samples of branding projects the branding company has completed. This basic request will show you the caliber of work of each of your respondents, as well as provide an opportunity to hear and see their process, as well as their success stories.

6) List Your RFP Process and Timeline

In order to compare branding proposals more effectively, it’s important to define how you want their proposals submitted to you, including due dates. Is email accepted? Does the file format need to be a PDF? Do you have file size limitations? Do you have a maximum number of pages? You may also require a specific outline format in addition to any naming conventions that are to follow.

It goes without saying that there will be questions. You should have specific protocols for incoming questions and the deadline for receiving them. In order to prevent you from answering the same questions over and over, it is a good idea to include a web link where applicant questions and your answers can be posted. Your website or Google Docs are great places for this.

7) Discuss Your Branding or Rebranding Budget

If you are able to clearly define the scope of the project, deliverables, timeline and requirements, you may be in a good place to define budgetary range. This range can help prevent wide pricing variations.

8) Pose Questions for the Branding Company to Answer

Presenting questions you may ask of your prospective branding company partner will help you gain insights into their thinking and culture and how it can relate back to your business. How the questions are answered can be helpful in the selection process.

The following are questions you should have your branding agency answer, in addition to having them provide a company overview and their accreditations:

  • What is your branding/rebranding process?
  • Why do you think you are the best branding company for the project?
  • Tell us about your leadership and creative team members.
  • What makes you different from your competitors?
  • Which of your team members will be doing the work?

THese tips help you avoid making RFP Mistakes

Omitting key information can lead to dramatically different proposals with tremendously wide variety of cost, resources and timeline. It could waste a lot of time for you and for the branding companies responding to your RFP. Including the right elements will help generate branding proposals that are similar enough for you to be comparing apples to apples.

About the author: Lou Leonardis is Partner and Branding Creative Director at Trillion, a creative studio that specializes in graphic design and web design with a focus on branding. He is a lifelong resident of New Jersey and brings nearly 20 years of design know-how to Trillion. His branding and graphic design work is published internationally and has been recognized with many awards and honors. Lou’s design education was at duCret School of Art as well as School of Visual Arts. You can find Lou and Trillion on Facebook and Twitter @trillioncreates.

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