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IABC NJ Spring Social Shows How Comedy Can Enable Standout Communications

Comedy can enable standout communications... it comes with risk, but can bring great rewards.

That’s how Chip Ambrogio characterizes the use of humor in strategic communications, both inside and outside an organization. The award-winning communicator, comedian and comedy writer provided insights on leveraging the power of the laugh to educate and inspire during IABC New Jersey’s recent Spring Social. The social brought together nearly 50 New Jersey communications professionals, both IABC members and beyond, May 17 at the Basking Ridge Country Club. ??Chip’s background as a stand-up comedian and comedy writer includes writing for the Friars Club Roast, TV and film, and many of today's top performers. He has successfully used that experience to add appropriate humor and fun to a diverse corporate communications. He showed how appealing to an audience’s funny bone can raise awareness, create a sense of community, enhance performance and align with an organization’s corporate mission.

But, first, about those risks, which are office politics and egos, the chance of stepping on toes, navigating areas of diversity and inclusion, to name a few. Comedy is subjective, and some people are literal. Balance those with the rewards – using humor can stand out from traditional tactics. It can also create connection on multiple levels – whether it’s great writing, great performance or a strong emotional appeal. Great comedians – Robin Williams, Richard Pryor and George Carlin – mastered each of these, respectively, Chip shared.

Chip’s own comedic journey began nearly a quarter century ago when he was in a job he hated. An advertisement for a comedy class in the Village Voice caught his eye, and he entered the world of stand up. At the same time, he began a new job in communications.

“For the last 23 years, I’ve been dealing with difficult audiences, prima donnas and with hecklers, and then of course there was the stand-up,” Chip says. “But the more I did stand-up at night and communications during the day, the more I saw the connection – the cross-over skills – where comedy could help me with my day job.”?Chip’s takeaways included:

  • Write for the stage, not for the page. Be conversational, be engaging and humanize the perspective.
  • Get to the point, and do it fast. Writing a great joke is about getting from the set-up to the punch line as fast as possible. The approach also applies to communications tactics.
  • Make the core message clear. Great communication and great comedy is stripping down to the connection … to what the audience can take home with them.
  • Comedy lets you create characters and tell a story. “By putting the characters in similar situation as the audience, we build empathy and understanding, and get them to laugh,” says Chip. “It’s less parental and more organic way to get the word out.”
  • Take risks, and enjoy success.
  • All you really need is that first one to work. You need someone to believe and then deliver on it.


According to Chip, learning to use humor appropriately in a corporate situation is an art, but if you're willing to take a chance the benefits are many. After all, comedy can elicit an emotional reaction much more than any email can. Seinfeld would say if an audience does not laugh at a joke, it means they do not like the joke. It does not mean they do not like me. Chip adds: “That fearlessness allows you to open doors, get buy-in on projects other people may be afraid to pitch, and open up new ways to connect with your audience.”??Thank you to IABC New Jersey Spring Social cocktail opening hour sponsor Davis & Company, as well as IABC sponsors Spi Group, Monmouth University, Fairleigh Hickinson University, BMW Morristown and HomeAdvisor. Find out more about IABC New Jersey, join and get involved at the IABC New Jersey website.

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An inside look at Verizon’s Innovation Lab and how emerging technology can change how the world connects

by Malecia S. Walker

As the speed of communications becomes more crucial to business, busy professionals don’t have time to wait for their mobile devices to perform.

At April’s IABC New Jersey professional development event, business communicators got a look into how new technology might affect the way the world works. As part of “Future Tech and the Future of Communications,” Verizon offered a tour of its Innovation Lab in Bedminster, N.J., on April 26, which included a peek – and at times no pictures, please – at developments in mobile communications technology, such as 5G.

Howie Waterman, media relations lead for wireless networks and technology at Verizon, and Lutz Erhlich, director of device performance, offered some insight to attendees before the group split up for tours.

“We always try to be ahead of the curve,” Waterman said of Verizon’s efforts with 5G, which is being tested in 11 U.S. cities and is expected to bring faster speeds and shorter wait times to device users.

To highlight the evolution of mobile phones today, Erhlich asked the group to take out their phones, look at a slide of an old newspaper ad from RadioShack, then determine the relationship between the phones and the products in the ad.

“Everything except the microwave” is in the smartphone, he said.

Although the process is extensive, evaluations of new devices are done within a three-week time period, Erhlich added. A device’s path to consumers includes simulating locations with background noise and field testing in situations like driving (presumably hands-free).

If a manufacturer’s device fails on multiple fronts, Waterman said, Verizon will not allow it to reach its retail storefronts or retail website.

On the tour, communicators saw firsthand what devices go through. Tests are performed early (repeated as much as 20 times) to see how well batteries withstand shock if, for example, a user touches something that generates static electricity. Products are tumbled by a machine then visually inspected for damage. A second chamber drops devices six times on multiple sides onto a steel plate at the bottom. If those tests aren’t passed, they go back to the manufacturer.

But if they make it past that point, the devices are tested for other qualities like sound clarity -- in a soundproof room, of course -- using male and female voices in different languages. A room is also exclusively used to test various antennas.

What does all this mean for the future of the communications profession? Time and network speed will tell.

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Getting Through the Resume Black Hole

By Debra Capua, Davis & Company

Going through the job search process is no easy task as recruiting continues to become more impersonal. But with persistence and know-how, you can stand out from the crowd. IABC NJ’s expert panel recently shared tips for landing the job of your dreams.  

1) Put your accomplishments front and center
Sandra Ille, Human Resources Business Partner for Bayer Corporation, an expert in talent acquisition, stresses the importance of having accomplishments related to the job you’re applying for at the top of your resume. That means that in addition to tailoring your key words to each job description, your accomplishments should clearly relate to the position you aspire to.

And have no fear if you’re looking to transition to a new career, have been out of the job market or are starting your career. You do have accomplishments to highlight. Think about what you’ve achieved and how it related to the job you are seeking.

If you’ve been taking care of an elderly parent, for example, highlight your financial acumen, negotiation skills (necessary for navigating through the home healthcare maze) and flexibility.  

In college? You have transferable skills from internships and part-time jobs.

2) Meet your audience’s needs
Recruiters are busy and have stacks of resumes to review. That means you have just 6 seconds to get the recruiter’s attention.

Sandy Charet, President of Charet & Associates, a Senior Recruiter for PR, Corporate Communications, Investor Relations, Employee Communications and related fields, says it’s crucial to make the resume easy to read. No one wants to go through pages of dense text, so keep it short, scannable and remember white space.

Knowing about those precious 6 seconds is another reason to focus on getting your accomplishments to stand out at the top of the resume.

3) Network, network, network
Ilene Kahn, Project Specialist at Davis & Company, is a savvy networker who recently joined this internal communication consulting firm after a career in publishing. She encourages job seekers to make the most of LinkedIn to find people who can introduce you to those who work at companies you’re targeting in your search. Ilene is also a firm believer in being creative and adding a personal touch, as long as you stay authentic.

All of our experts agreed on the importance of networking and building relationships, particularly before a job is posted. Do your research, target the companies you’d like to work for and forge relationships. Most people are happy to help.

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