Our Sponsors






Blog

An inside look at Verizon’s Innovation Lab and how emerging technology can change how the world connects

by Malecia S. Walker

As the speed of communications becomes more crucial to business, busy professionals don’t have time to wait for their mobile devices to perform.

At April’s IABC New Jersey professional development event, business communicators got a look into how new technology might affect the way the world works. As part of “Future Tech and the Future of Communications,” Verizon offered a tour of its Innovation Lab in Bedminster, N.J., on April 26, which included a peek – and at times no pictures, please – at developments in mobile communications technology, such as 5G.

Howie Waterman, media relations lead for wireless networks and technology at Verizon, and Lutz Erhlich, director of device performance, offered some insight to attendees before the group split up for tours.

“We always try to be ahead of the curve,” Waterman said of Verizon’s efforts with 5G, which is being tested in 11 U.S. cities and is expected to bring faster speeds and shorter wait times to device users.

To highlight the evolution of mobile phones today, Erhlich asked the group to take out their phones, look at a slide of an old newspaper ad from RadioShack, then determine the relationship between the phones and the products in the ad.

“Everything except the microwave” is in the smartphone, he said.

Although the process is extensive, evaluations of new devices are done within a three-week time period, Erhlich added. A device’s path to consumers includes simulating locations with background noise and field testing in situations like driving (presumably hands-free).

If a manufacturer’s device fails on multiple fronts, Waterman said, Verizon will not allow it to reach its retail storefronts or retail website.

On the tour, communicators saw firsthand what devices go through. Tests are performed early (repeated as much as 20 times) to see how well batteries withstand shock if, for example, a user touches something that generates static electricity. Products are tumbled by a machine then visually inspected for damage. A second chamber drops devices six times on multiple sides onto a steel plate at the bottom. If those tests aren’t passed, they go back to the manufacturer.

But if they make it past that point, the devices are tested for other qualities like sound clarity -- in a soundproof room, of course -- using male and female voices in different languages. A room is also exclusively used to test various antennas.

What does all this mean for the future of the communications profession? Time and network speed will tell.

Return to list

0 Comments